The Stourbridge Canal Photographed in Infra-red

The Stourbridge Canal is a canal in the West Midlands of England. It links the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal at Stourton Junction, affording access to traffic from the River Severn with the Dudley Canal at the heart of the Black Country.

On bright sunny days, when normal photography would be out of the question (due to contrast problem) I usually take out my Nikon D100. This is a camera I had converted to take Infrared images. What makes digital infrared photography so exciting is, there are no rules and there are no boundaries. You, the photographer, have complete control over the final image. Your main concern should always be with your white balance settings, once you’ve got to grips with that the rest is just plain sailing; Auto levels and a slight contrast boost will almost certainly improve your images. As for the rest; well let your imaginations run wild.

The Stourbridge canal leaves the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal at Stourton Junction, and immediately enters a four-lock flight to gain height and continues towards the Stourbridge Arm (on the same level) and into the centre of Stourbridge, while a flight of sixteen locks takes the canal up the hill towards Brierley Hill. From here, the Fens Branch is a short, navigable feeder from Fens Pools and the main canal continues for 1.8 miles to Delph Locks, a flight at the start of the Dudley Canal, which originally consisted of nine locks, but was rebuilt as eight in 1858.

The canal forms part of the Stourport Ring, which is one of the popular cruising rings for leisure boating. The length of the route is 74 miles, passes through 105 locks located on six inter-connected waterways.

Scenery along most canals lends itself beautifully to charms and delights of infrared photography as I hope these images show. Everything here was taken with a Nikon D100 using a custom white balance (in camera) and a Nikon 18-200mm f3.5-5.6 VR lens.

If you want to know more about Infrared Photography, what cameras are best, what filters to use and how to set your white balance I have set up a Beginners Guide to Infrared Photography at: www.infrared-photography.co.uk

Downloads are available for most of the images shown here and for the fixed price of just £4.99 each.

All downloads are medium sized .jpeg files,  approximately 1400 pixels in the longest length  @ 72dpi and are protected by International copyright laws.

To those who purchase/download my work  I am willing to grant you personal, non-exclusive, non-transferable, right to use my images on your personal web site/blog, provided that no image is displayed at a resolution greater than 800 x 600 pixels.

I also give my permission for you to use them as screensavers and mobile phone wallpaper for your own personal, non-commercial use.

I am also happy to supply you with larger files, for editorial or advertising in magazines, newspapers, books, book covers and eBooks. Or, if you prefer, as prints to hang on your wall, at home or in your office. All you have to do is contact me: dotcomjohnny@gmail.com

I do not allow my images to be resold or re-distributed on shared disk drives, computer networks, cloud space and social networking websites such as Facebook and Twitter. Also, you may not display my work in such a way that gives the impression that it was created by you.

If you’re unsure of your rights under these terms and conditions, or if you wish to use an image in a way not covered by the above, please contact me: dotcomjohnny@gmail.com


About admin

John’s involvement with photography has lasted for more than a quarter of a century, although schooled in the use of film John embraced the digital age very early on. He describes himself as a discerning photographer who sees digital imaging as a tool rather than a box of tricks, a photographer whose images are linked by a natural instinct for subject arrangement and attention to detail. His approach to photography is spontaneous – seeking to recapture for the viewer the same mood and atmosphere that drew him to the subject in the first place.
This entry was posted in Black Country, Infrared Photography, Nikon, photography, West Midlands and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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